Sunday, December 20, 2020

WASHINGTONS CROSSING


 I took an afternoon, a cold one mind you, one day, to head up the river to Washington's Crossing here in Bucks County. It's a cute little village and blink three times and your through the whole town. But the main attraction as you guessed, is what the title implies. I have been before to the main park area and visitors center, but have not walked around other parts of the park and area. Every December it's pretty big business on Christmas Day normally, for there is a huge re-enactment of George Washington's crossing of the Delaware River. A tradition for many to come see every year.  This is the location where Washington crossed the river on the night of December 25-26 in 1776 in the American Revolutionary War. This daring maneuver led to the victory in the Battle of Trenton, and altered the course of the war, against the Hessians. 


The whole of Washington's Crossing encapsulates the crossing on the PA side. It covers about 500 acres, and includes the actual embarkation site for the mail crossing, the 18th century inn, sits on the foundation of the original inn that was present at the time of crossing, a memorial marker that indicates the site of the crossing, the Bowman's Hill Tower, the Thompson-Neely House, the Hibb House, and a grist mill, that all served the army with shelter and also used to bury the dead.
The Thompson Neely House
The Thompson-Neely House was built in 1757 and served as Washington's regimental army hospital during the winter of 1776-77. Future President James Monroe who was wounded during the first battle recuperated here. It was originally built and owned by Robert Thompson, along with his son in law William Neely... and then passed on to Robert's grandson.

The Hibbs House- came later....built circa 1828  and was leased as a tenant house for a craftsmen. The house served as home to a shoemaker, then a cooper, a wheelright and finally a carpenter, Abdon Hibbs.
McConkey's Ferry Inn, the oldest of the structures at Washington's Crossing.
The old grist mill.
In this picture one can see the huge tower in the background. The views on top of it are astounding. I'm not sure why the tower was built ...which was in 1929, but the site on Bowman's Hill was the highest point in the area, giving Washington's army a birds eye view of any ambushes. In addition to all that history, the park is also well known for it's trail system and wildlife habitat. A wide variety of migrating birds use the stream and ravine as a resting place and for nesting, while many others winter in the park. But to my delight, were the many sheep at the Thompson-Neely Farmstead, and I must say, some of the most photogenic sheep I have ever met.
Can you believe these two?

It was a great day to walk about. And since Travel Penguin seems to be a fan of Washington and sheep, I dedicate this post to him.

46 comments:

  1. What an historical treasure!

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  2. It always make me smile when you mention Bucks County as 3 miles down the road from us is the county of Buckinghamshire (aka Bucks county). Buckingham, a small little market town, itself is about 8 miles over the border from Oxfordshire.

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    1. Well funny you should mention that Helen. Right beside Doylestown, the next town over ia a town called....Buckingham!!!!! When William Penn settled much of this area, he named them after town from the UK. My fair hamlet Chalfont, is named after William Penn's wife's town she hailed from in the UK. Bucks County is quite a charming place to live in PA

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  3. Enjoyed the history and all the pictures.
    Bouncing around between 2 countries I
    missed ever getting American history.
    xoxo :-)

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  4. I love the living history of all those old buildings.

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  5. I remember my parents taking my brother and I there for a picnic sometime in the 1960's. I don't recall which year, but I remember we listened to a Phillies game on her transistor radio while we ate. Thank you for teaching us all this history of that region.

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    1. It almost gives chills walking around , thinking of all the history that went on there.

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  6. Oh, what beautiful pictures!!!! William and I have been up that way, and dinned in Washington's Crosssing, but never did the tour or walked the ground there. But I am betting that's the homestead we passed. That area there above New Hope is so picturesque. I went up to Bowman's Hill once, but your to old to climb the tower, but I heard the views are spectacular. The drive up the hill is downright scary!

    A timely post for the holidays. Loved all those sheep too!

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    1. That drive up to Bowman Tower is scary, considering there is no guide rails on the side!!! It is a DROP down!

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  7. Cap Chasen12/20/2020

    Beautiful park and grounds, and those sheep sure do like their picture taken. It great this is all persevered. Rich with Revolutionary War history, Absolutely gorgeous grounds, and along the Delaware River. Much history to be immersed in. I love stuff like this. Would love to see that some day. I guess the pandemic will put a hold of this years re-enactment?

    I have really been enjoying you blog lately...some great and fun post in the last week...thank you!

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  8. Excellent pictures! It does look cold! I have a distant cousin in the spring coming for a visit, maybe and loves American History. This would be a great thing to take them to see. Isn't there a Wildflower preserve nearby too I believe? Those sheep!

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    1. Yes, the Wildlfower Preserve is very lovely. It is actually right before Washington Crossing, closer to where Bowman's Hill is.

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  9. sweaters on the hoof, baa baa! I have never visited washington crossing.

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  10. I remember from my history book "100 decisive battles of history" The Battle of Trenton is one of them as it meant to 'keep going' rather than give up.

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  11. This is fantastic. I love living history like this, and to think that those structures are still standing - ! Look at you being all artistic and photo-pro; these are wonderful pictures. You even make the sheep look classy. Wouldn't it be fun to take a turn through here together at some date in the future? I'd hold your parasol for you. We could hold a two person re-enactment of Crossing The Deleware with a pedal boat. You could look vigilant, and I'd wear a ruffly bathing suit and a tricorn hat. I'm sure the Parks Department would approve.

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    1. We'd must definitely have to you tube that shit sugarplums! Ill even bring the wig and gloves!

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  12. Incredibly Beautiful Park!!! I love that the park combines the important history of our nation and wonderful nature trails, that ok in my book. There's a lot of sheep there too.

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  13. An awesome time in history, one of my favorites to learn about. It's so cool to know this is so close by. I would love to come see it at some point, the houses and such are so cool to see.

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  14. The pics are loverly. One of the many things I find funny is that in movies they try to make the Delaware River look miles wide and in reality it's just a little wider then the Snitz Creek.

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  15. How beautiful!!!! If I ever get back to PA again, I have got to hit Bucks County. Did the Philly thing already. I'm curious if you know anything about the route Washington took from this point to Trenton. Are there particular roads he took that still exist? Was it through a wooded area that is still wooded? Or perhaps the details of the exact route were never recorded. And the sheep! Make me want some?

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    1. Thanks for you query Dame Micaux....I believe they have a good idea of the route and it does start at that one spot in the park on the PA side and it goes out away from the water East a little bit then heads South. I believe they entered somewhere in Trenton by King street as I believe it was called at the time I heard. I also believe it was mostly snowy and research has told about their being bloody footprints from the men that had ragged or no footwear although that may be a myth. It would be cool to retrace it but assume a lot of it is on private property now.

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  16. I love your part of Pennsylvania. My kids live in Schuylkill county. It makes all those stories from the history books come alive to be standing right on the place where it actually happened.

    Thanks!

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    1. It really does. It's cool to be standing there knowing who and what was going on there all those years ago. The land is relatively unchanged. Thanks for poppin in Debby! 🎄🎄🎄

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  17. Beautifully put together post... and I love to see the places and learn about the history. I am beginning to see why a tv show based in your area would kame for a cool show..with all that has happened and happening there. AMS for sure!

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  18. Great post Maddie as usual!

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  19. That is so cool! It's nice you have the time to get out and see some of these things while you can. It even more amazing thinking how old all that is and it's still there. It's very pretty, but what is with all the sheep?

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    1. Sheep have been apart of the homestead since Washington's time and they also have at least 10 -18 sheep there. I think you can even adopt a sheep and supply hay and such. They also I understand do a sheering the public can view certain times. When I drive by, I always like seeing them in the field.

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  20. You and I, kid. You are my kind of tourist. I love learning about this stuff. Would adore an opportunity to see it all. How fun. Thanks for taking us with you. A little distraction from everything else is just what the doctor called for! Kizzes.

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  21. What a great post!
    The houses are so bonny.
    It seems ever so strange to hear place names like Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire as places in the US.

    Those sheep! 😀😀

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    1. Much of Bucks was settled by people from England, I thinks that why. If blindfolded, in certain parts I almost don't think you'd know your in England or the states. It's very English countryside in parts Christina. Hope you well...and love your new picture here. Is the one of your grandchildren?

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  22. Oh, I love touring historical sites! Thanks for giving us a glimpse into this momentous time in history. Living history spots, pioneer villages, and colonial sites are always on our radar to visit. Especially the hubby. We will add this to our list.Is Bowman's Tower worth a trip up to the top?

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  23. So much incredible history. (Which looks very cold.) The sheep (and their photos) are beautiful.

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  24. Those two in the final pic look like they're soul-mates who've just discovered each other. Sweet.

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    1. I think your right Raybeard. It looked they like had longed all their life...

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  25. I need to go out East. I love history and could be lost for months out there.

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    1. In that case yoi can stay for months here then!!!!!

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  26. Hi Maddie
    It won't let me reply under my original comment. That's my granddaughter, Ida. She's a sassy girl.😂😂

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  27. THANK YOU! George Washington had dinner with friends 250 feet from my window, a week before he died - and sheep, how sweet. Baah, Baah! THANK YOU!

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    1. Soon as I saw the sheep i thought of you.

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  28. Oh, this is so fantastic!
    Love, love, love history and visiting sites that are so meaningful to the history of the country! Those buildings are fabulous. You choose the best topics.

    XOXO

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  29. Well done, Maddie. I enjoy your travelogues. They're always so good, you should become a travel writer. Oh, look! Another choice for a new career when the virus is gone.

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    1. Thank you Pat!!!!! But I'd rather review sex clubs.!!!!

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  30. I remember seeing all those paintings of Washington's crossing. I was always amazed.

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    1. Like Dave said, they always show the river as being wider then it is or a raging river like in the movie The River Wild. It's actually a pretty calm, fasting flowing river, and not as wide as many other rivers. Pretty cool none the less.

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  31. We should have explored that area when we lived in Maryland. It looks beautiful and sounds fascinating.

    Love,
    Janie

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Go ahead darling, tell me something fabulous!

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