Tuesday, July 30, 2019

TOXIC

The Lad inspired this post. He knows I love flowers, and saw an article and said it reminded him of me. After reading it, I didn't know whether to take it as a compliment or insult. He always tells me I'm pretty but deadly, or he'll tell people I'm a Penis Fly Trap!!!!!  I apparently lure men in then suck them in?!?! That might be true, but deadly???  The article did surprise me though and fond it interesting. When it comes to nature, the general rule of thumb is this: The dangerous stuff looks scary, and the harmless stuff looks beautiful (or, at the very least, unassuming). So it might be a surprise, then, to learn that some plants and flowers in our own gardens—often beautiful, always unassuming—rank among the most dangerous things on the planet. Did you know about some of these?

Oleander
Known for it's striking flowers in the summer, parts of the oleander plant contain cardiac glycosides that cause acute cardias toxicity and serve digestive issues.

White Snake Root
White snakeroot, is a poisonous herb found in North America that contains a toxic alcohol called tremetol. But just how poisonous is this plant? Well, back when explorers were first settling Indiana and Ohio in the early 19th century, it’s estimated that up to half of their deaths—including that of Abraham Lincoln’s mother, Nancy Hanks Lincoln—were caused by indirectly ingesting white snakeroot. 

Water Hemlock
If you know anything about water hemlock, then it’s likely that you’re familiar with the plant’s claim to fame: killing Socrates. According to the USDA, this plant contains the toxin cicutoxin, which, when ingested, acts directly on the central nervous system. In the most extreme cases, that could result in grand mal seizures and death.

Lily of the Valley
One of my favorites! This perennial outdoor ornamental herb, a popular staple of outdoor gardens everywhere, can actually be incredibly toxic. Its toxicity comes from the cardiac glycosides and saponins present in the plants, which can affect the heart if eaten. Lily of the valley is so toxic, in fact, that the CBIF notes cases where both people and animals have fallen ill by merely drinking water the plant was in.

Foxglove
The foxglove plant produces digoxin, an active ingredient in medications that prevent heart failure. According to the NCPC, by ingesting foxglove, you’re essentially “taking an unregulated dose of heart medicine,” which can, ironically, cause heart failure. As such, you should keep this plant far, far away from children and animals.

Wistria
When it comes to dangerous plants in your backyard, wisteria is one of the worst ones there is. According to one case study from the Santa Clara Valley Medical Center, the wisteria plant can cause headaches, gastroenteritis, hematemesis, dizziness, confusion, diaphoresis, and, frighteningly, syncopal episodes (or temporary drops in blood flow to the brain that result in a loss of consciousness and control of the muscles). These symptoms typically last for five to seven days after eating more than a few berries from the plant—if they don’t kill you.

Daffodil
If you seek help quickly, ingesting daffodils won’t kill you. However, according to the NCPC, ingestion can be fatal to small children and pets if left untreated. And while all parts of a daffodil contain the toxic chemical lycorine, it’s the oxalates—or toxic chemicals found in the plant’s bulb—that do the most damage to your body.

Hydrangea
As far as the poisonous nature of the popular hydrangea plant is concerned, only the flower buds are truly harmful when ingested, according to the Canadian Biodiversity Information Facility. If consumed, humans can experience an upset stomach, skin irritation, and, in more serious cases, convulsions and coma.

Devil's Helmut
Just a few years ago, a gardener died after simply brushing up against a devil’s helmet plant. And believe it or not, the plant’s exterior isn’t even its most poisonous part. As poison expert John Robertson told BBC News, the most poisonous part of the plant is actually its roots, as ingestion of this specific part causes heart failure. Most fatalities occur within the first few hours.

Tulips
Tulips might make your garden shine, but they also have the potential to poison your pet. According to the ASPCA, this plant is toxic to dogs, cats, and horses in its bulb especially, and symptoms of ingestion range from vomiting and diarrhea to hypersalivation.

Angel's Trumpet
Angel’s trumpet is a tropical plant known for its Bugle-shaped flowers. And while it’s aesthetically pleasing, the last thing you’d ever want to do is find out what it tastes like: As one 2008 case report published in Pediatrics & Child Health notes, ingestion can cause dangerous hallucinogenic symptoms like loss of consciousness and delirium. 

Poison Ivy
The one I can be compared to, my favorite villain….As its name suggests, poison ivy is, well, poisonous. Found all over the United States, this plant contains a resin called urushiol that causes an epidermal allergic reaction characterized by redness, itching, and swelling. If the plant sets on fire and you inhale the smoke, it can also affect your breathing.

So maybe the Lad is right. Don't judge a book by it's cover. I won't lie, I may be pretty in the eyes, but can be deadly in the boudoir. You know, plants can be deadly if you eat it, but a kiss can be deadlier if you mean it. Coincidence then that Toxic used to be one of my favorite drag routines?

28 comments:

  1. who the hell would eat pretty flowers like these?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Now you know there are some dumb asses somewhere that would eat these. Might explain the trumps.

      Delete
  2. I did know this about some. Hydrangea is among one of my favorite and had no idea. Now Foxglove I did know about and while pretty, I never cared to have them in the house. Don't they have little prickers on them?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. maddie only likes things with big pricks; go big or go home, she always says!

      Delete
  3. Oh, no, not daffodils! I did know about oleander. We grew up with them. Didn't know about them as children and we were always picking the flowers. Kids are more likely to put a plant in their mouths. I stopped with the oleander once I noticed the little green crablike spiders on them. *SHUDDER* It's amazing that my sisters and I survived childhood :)

    ReplyDelete
  4. ak! ak! ak! I'm digging up the little
    daffodil bulbs in the gnome garden this
    year and when they are frozen!!!

    ReplyDelete
  5. Wow! Who knew? Always something intresting your posting. I adore flowers.

    ReplyDelete
  6. I've seen restaurants try to get all fancy by putting flowers on food. I will never, ever accept a meal with those after reading this post.

    Besides, wisteria sounds like what I had at Del Taco when I missed out on meeting up with Fearsome Beard, Sassybear and his husband nearly two weeks ago.

    ReplyDelete
  7. That's why you usually don't see anything eating these flowers. Same with milkweed, buttercups, daisies and there are some really nasty ones like giant hogweed, wild parsnip they will burn your skin and leave scars for years. Stick to lettuce and tomatoes lol, although tomato and potato plants are also toxic as they are part of the nightshade family. Darn, now Deedles is going to get me for being a nerd again. XD

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. See, the Mistress needs us boys for welfare and safety.

      Delete
    2. In all fairness, Steven, I never called you the n word! What I said was "you need to get laid". I apologized for it too! I also agree with Cali-Boi. Maddie needs you. No telling how many poisonous plants he'll get in trouble with as much as he likes to run around in the woods nekkid!

      Delete
    3. Steven, I think Deedles is saying we better move the wedding up. Don't worry about our garden, I'm good at hoeing the bounty in, but I don't want to get pricked over the wrong plant.

      Delete
    4. Maddie, I don't really know Steven, but he doesn't seem like the kind of guy who would let you do any hoeing after you are married. Just saying.

      Delete
  8. The prettiest things are almost always deadly or at lest dangerous. Brittany's Toxic was a nice touch Mistress.

    ReplyDelete
  9. Oh, you are most definitely tempting to play with dear....Penis Fly Trap!!!! Two snaps to the Lad!!! But yes however, appearances can be deceptive and not all flowers are fit to be fooled with as some exotic blooms have a much darker side to them. Two others I learned about when going for a degree were Opium, which is hard to believe that such a beautiful flower can produce such a deadly and addictive drug but that’s exactly what opium does, when it’s processed to make heroin. And the stunning Daphne, famous for its wonderful scented flowers – but this shrub has the power to kill. Its berries can induce a coma or sudden death. And the Autumn Crocus is a cute pretty flower but is also one of the world’s most endangered and poisonous. The toxic colchicine that it contains can cause an immediate cardiac arrest.

    ReplyDelete
  10. Great post and comments and info, who knew? Yikes.

    ReplyDelete
  11. Deceptively beautiful, alluringly addictive, inevitably toxic but not lethal.....my favorite combination.

    I never heard of white snake root or its connection with Lincoln's mother. Fascinating.

    ReplyDelete
  12. Loads of plants can be deadly - if anyone were daft enough to eat them, of course. You might be interested to read about Lady Percy's "Poison Garden" at Alnwick Castle in Northumberland, in which she fatures all of 'em. A witch's paradise... Jx

    ReplyDelete
  13. Would have loved to have seen you perform Toxic. I knew about some of these toxic plants by others were a surprise. I’ll have to remember to steer clear of devil’s helmet.

    ReplyDelete
  14. Why am I thinking of the Wicked Witch of the West? "My wonderful, wonderful wickedness!"

    ReplyDelete
  15. Soooooo if any of us receive flowers from you , should we be worried?

    ReplyDelete
  16. Well, I knew about a couple of those...but TwoLips??? You can suck me in any day!

    ReplyDelete
  17. I have long said the prettiest things are deadly. I myself have a ton of wisteria .

    ReplyDelete
  18. That's practically my whole herb-&-spice rack!

    ReplyDelete

Go ahead darling, tell me something fabulous!

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...