Thursday, May 3, 2018

INNER TAPOPHILE

Now before you think I'm completely insane, or Warbucks and I had sex in a cemetery... people...clear that thought!!!! I do consider myself a tapophile....otherwise known as a "cemetery enthusiast", "cemetery tourist", "grave hunter", "graver" who has a passion for and enjoyment of cemeteries, epitaphs, photography, art, and death. Death has never scared me, nor do I fear it. But I enjoy cemeteries so. Even right next to the Casa du Borghese is a very old graveyard dating to 1795. I once had a friend who just walking by one, would have a anxiety attack. He would never even come to stay with I and a good friend for a long weekend, who lives right off the graveyards of the Gettysburg Battlefields.  But I digress. This visit also saw us at Laurel Hill Cemetery in Philadelphia for a day.
Laurel Hill Cemetery was founded in 1836 as a nonsectarian alternative to Philadelphia’s crowded, inner-city churchyards of the early nineteenth century. Intended for use by the living, as well as the dead, the cemetery’s design takes advantage of scenic Schuylkill River vistas, supported by the addition of winding paths and rare horticultural specimens.
Established in 1836, Laurel Hill is one of Philadelphia's premier historic landmarks and one of the only cemeteries in the United States to be honored as a National Historic Landmark. Countless prominent people of local and national fame are buried at Laurel Hill, including George G. Meade and thirty-nine other Civil War-era generals, in addition to six Titantic passengers, poets and authors, numerous polictians, and members of high society. Their extensive archives undoubtedly serve as a superb resource for scholars, researchers and genealogists. Moreover, Laurel Hill's natural beauty and peaceful serenity render it a bucolic retreat nestled within the city's limits overlooking,  high above the Schuylkill River. The cemetery's beautiful green space is further complimented by the breathtaking art, sculpture and architecture that can be found here. These are just some of the many attributes that render Laurel Hill Cemetery a primary destination for both residents and visitors to the City of Brotherly Love.

Even in all this restful garden of the dead...was a  sign of continuing life......
We have no idea if this fellow got here from the pond or the river, but we hoped his family wasn't far.

It was a good day.
To read other posts on Laurel Hill,  just click it in the tags.

32 comments:

  1. Tapophile? You've taught me a new word today!

    ReplyDelete
  2. If things go right for me, I'll be buried out beyond Jupiter.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Loves the ducky! Our white Labrador got written up as a ghost once - local cemetery was on our walk every night and she ghosted in and out of the headstones.

    ReplyDelete
  4. DUCK! Sorry. I read that as tadpole and wondered what that had to do with cemeteries. Actually, as a kid, I used to play in the two adjacent cemeteries near my home in San Diego. Mount Hope and Greenwood Memorial never looked anything like those creepy graveyards in movies. There are a few historical people buried there, including Raymond Chandler. I still love a good burial ground for the prettiness and serenity. I grew up wanting to be the person who cut the grass at a cemetery. I enjoyed reading the headstones and making up stories about the people I was walking on at the time. We also gathered tadpoles and frogs from a pond if I recall right.
    It seems, at least from pictures, that the further east you travel the more history is in the entombment parks (I'm tired of typing cemeteries). This one is very beautiful.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. When I saw you enjoyed them I knew I wanted to do a post on this. I have extra opera glasses if you need them dear.

      Delete
    2. Thank you Maddie. You are a true sweetheart!

      Delete
  5. Fascinating and historical cemetery! This is one of the most beautiful cemeteries I have ever seen. And it is historical, too.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Great post and stunning architecture...but you never had sex in a cemetery yet???

    ReplyDelete
  7. You could wander for days. This looks like a great cemetery to go to and bring your walking shoes. Beautiful mausoleums.

    ReplyDelete
  8. I never knew the word for it, but I, too, love cemeteries; they are so peaceful.

    ReplyDelete
  9. What a gorgeous and picturesque site! Stunning art and spectacular natural beauty! I would love to explore that magnificent landscape for days and nights! I bet the night skies must seem fantastic with so many stars and a magical moon!

    The duckling was just icing on the cake! A diamond in a treasure chest! I hope the little critter is safe and happy in his lovely home!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Eros- then you would love it. You can take a tour, or go your own pace. They have many music concerts there, more like jazz, classical or folk and at Halloween, as Josh points out a Grand Grave Diggers Ball, not to mention haunting poetry reads and late night tours. It's pretty cool.

      Delete
  10. I remember my first recital in Philly was for the Grave Diggers Ball when I moved her and joined the symphony and was fascinated by all the notable people buried in Laurel Hill Cemetery. I saw the graves of Civil War soldiers and officers, signers of the Declaration of Independence, famous Philadelphians throughout history in different ways. But the various styles of the monuments and the lay of the land overlooking the Schuylkill River were beautiful.

    ReplyDelete
  11. It doesn't surprise me one bit you love cemeteries. You like anything quite and stiff.

    Tis a lovely setting thought.

    ReplyDelete
  12. Those photos are beautiful and not spooked all. My sister is like that, I didn't know there was a word for it. Her latest was a trip to New Orleans and she was excitedly showing me pictures of how everyone is entombed because with a high water table, they can't bury people.

    ReplyDelete
  13. That opening picture is downright stunning!

    My all-time favorite place in Philadelphia when I visited.
    I recently went on a tour of St. Louis Cemetery in New Orleans and I realized how spoiled Laurel Hill has made me.

    ReplyDelete
  14. Laurel Hill really comes to life, so to speak in the fall and spring...it's definitely a Philadelphia jewel to see.

    But unlike you, I don't think I could live next to one.

    ReplyDelete
  15. Being a tapophile is a lot better than a mechaphiliac. I learned that word today too, thanks to a news story on one in Kansas who got caught!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Eww! I'm picturing a guy with a vintage Mustang and a hot muffler! Owww!

      Delete
  16. I too love strolling old cemeteries, especially treasures like this one. Some of the stonework is amazing and the grounds can be beautiful. There was a civil war era cemetery across the street from the house I shared at university. One of the stones read something like "Here lies Sarah. The harlot got what she deserved."

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Coinedently that is also the name of my next autobiography.

      Delete
  17. If you going to have to rest eternally this is the place to do it. It's truly spectacular.

    ReplyDelete
  18. Some of those mausoleums are bigger than houses!
    I do like a cemetery, they somehow give me more of a connection with the past than anything else.
    Sx

    ReplyDelete
  19. One of my favorites is the cemetery in Key West. I’ll, have to stop by Laurel Hill one day.

    ReplyDelete
  20. I have yet to visit an historical cemetery. I just love them in general. Is that so wrong or crazy? That is a rhetorical question!

    ReplyDelete
  21. You know I love a good cemetery.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi honey...i have to call you soon, if I ever get a minute!!!

      Delete

Go ahead darling, tell me something fabulous!

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...